Samsung Lifts Veil On High Octane Exynos 5 Octa Processor

  • 70 percent more efficient
  • Made of eight cores in all
  • Heavy-duty multi-tasking

Samsung has iintroduced its next offering in mobile processors, the Exynos 5 Octa, which according to president of Samsung Stephen Woo, is the world’s first mobile application processor to implement the ARM big.LITTLE processing

  • 70 percent more efficient
  • Made of eight cores in all
  • Heavy-duty multi-tasking

Samsung has iintroduced its next offering in mobile processors, the Exynos 5 Octa, which according to president of Samsung Stephen Woo, is the world’s first mobile application processor to implement the ARM big.LITTLE processing technology based on Cortex A15 CPU.

According to the company, says the chip is 70 percent more efficient compared to the previous quad-core Exynos. It is made of eight cores in all – four hefty A15s and four Cortex A7s for lighter work. Though it saves on power, it's actually more than capable to take on demanding tasks like game play and high maintenance applications.

During a keynote address at CES, Woo said that the Exynos 5 Octa will offer a "level of pure processing power never before seen in a mobile device."

That will enable "heavy-duty multi-tasking" on a mobile gadget, Woo said. A device running the new processor would be able to look up a good dinner spot, while simultaneously downloading an app to make a reservation and retrieving GPS and mapping information – "all without lag or disruption," Woo said.

An Exynos 5 Octa-powered device will also "easily" handle HD movie streaming with "no dropped frames [and] razor-sharp picture quality," he continued. It was designed with high-end smartphones and tablets in mind. "The bottom line is, when you want multiple applications to perform at their best, you want the best processor available," Woo argued.

The processor takes advantage of ARM's Big.Little technology, which pairs the small, energy-efficient ARM Cortex-A7 chip with a larger, more powerful Cortex A-15 multicore chip. ARM announced Big.Little in Oct. 2011 and said at the time that OEMs, OS vendors, and application vendors will select which processor to use for certain tasks, turning each on and off to meet the power and performance needs of each function.

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