Harman Claims To Minimise Distractions With New Car Operating System

  • App-centric infotainment system
  • Can stream MP3 players
  • Add or remove apps at will

High-end American audio company Harman is demonstrating its scalable platform solution, leveraging the Android for Automotive operating system, at CES.

  • App-centric infotainment system
  • Can stream MP3 players
  • Add or remove apps at will

High-end American audio company Harman is demonstrating its scalable platform solution, leveraging the Android for Automotive operating system, at CES.

The company’s app-centric infotainment concept platform shepherds a new era for in-car experiences that connects drivers to their digital worlds – the home, the office, friends and the cloud – in ways that are claimed to be easy, fun, personalised and intuitive.

Its new infotainment system is designed for safe use in the car with one-touch access to the features– media, navigation, telephony, applications, and other settings. By placing these tabs at the bottom of every screen, drivers can find what they need while staying alert and keeping their attention focused on the road, claims the company.

Harman claims it is minimising distractions on the road by integrating sensitive icons in its new infotainment system that “grow” in size as a driver’s finger approaches the system touch screen. This ensures that the touch targets are big enough for users to find quickly the first time.

A new Harman curated applications store means consumers can discover and download versions of applications from streaming radio, audio book services, or the latest social media feeds that are developed or adapted specifically for the automotive environment. Because of the flexible design, the infotainment system is “future-proof,” meaning it can add or remove apps easily as new applications are invented or made available.

The system also allows access to content from iPods, smartphones and iPads by providing wired and wireless interfaces that are optimised for the driving environment. This includes media and applications that are running on consumer mobile devices, as well as those connecting via cloud-based services like Siri and Google Voice Search.

Drivers can select which applications correspond with specific tabs. For example, some drivers may prefer having the on-board navigation application launch when they press the Navigation button. Others may want Google Maps to launch when they press the Navigation button. These applications and services can be saved in a Favorites tab using one-touch access.

In the future, the system will be able to “learn” what the driver interacts with the most, and automatically add these choices to the Favorites screen. In addition, future systems will have the ability to store multiple profiles, so that each driver can enjoy a personalized infotainment experience adapted to their preferences. This includes unique Favorites screens, as well as personalized music preferences, calendars and seat positions.

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