Review: Motorola Razr HD

By Mike Wheeler

The two biggest kids on the block as far as smartphone sales are Apple and Samsung. Over the past 18 months, both companies have grabbed huge slices of the marketplace while other prominent lights such as Blackberry and Nokia were in freefall.

By Mike Wheeler

The two biggest kids on the block as far as smartphone sales are Apple and Samsung. Over the past 18 months, both companies have grabbed huge slices of the marketplace while other prominent lights such as Blackberry and Nokia were in freefall.

Nokia seems to have partially addressed its issues by dumping its Symbian operating system in favour of Microsoft Windows 8, but Blackberry’s management must be at the white-knuckle stage hoping that its Blackberry 10 – due to launch in January 2013 – doesn’t turn out to be its last hurrah. A fellow pioneer of both Nokia and Blackberry, is Motorola. It too, has suffered a relative collapse of marketshare over the past decade – who can forget those first brick-type mobile phones that are now seen more as uber-expensive paper weights?

For the past six months Motorola has been trying to claw back some of its losses with a series of handsets aimed squarely at the consumer market, the latest being the 4G-enabled Razr HD.

Out of the box, the first obvious thing to note is its weight and size. It feels a little bit more hefty than the original Razr, and has a more industrial design. But why a little heavier? I wasn’t too sure, so I thought I’d peel off the back and have a look, which was not possible as it was sealed shut. Similar to the iPhone, the slot of your SIM card is at the side, which you have to access via the good old-fashioned paper clip.

It has a 4.7-inch screen, which seems bigger than it looks and certainly holds its own in the resolution stakes – it is one of its standout features. It has what is becoming increasingly the norm with mobile handsets, an 8MP camera. It is standard fare – nothing spectacular like you’ll get on some rival smartphones, but it will do if pics are of secondary importance as to why you have the device.

One huge plus is the massive 2530mAh battery. It lasted just over two days with more than moderate use – this length of time is above average. To be fair I only streamed a few videos, but used it quite intensively with texting and talking etc.

It uses the Android 4.0 operating system, which is a little annoying in that the company says it can be upgraded to JellyBean (4.2) in the near future. Why not have that O/S in the first place?

Overall, this device gets more pluses than minuses, although if the biggest thing we are cheering about is battery life then Motorola still has a way to go. But it’s a nice start.

Pros: Battery life is huge; reasonable storage options; 4G
Cons: Hefty compared to previous; camera could be better

RRP
Varies depending on plans

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