Review: iPod nano

The newest third generation iPod nano is hard to find fault with.
The nano comes in the same 4GB and 8GB sizes as older models, however this nano is far more reminiscent of the iPod Video. Just by looking at it you’ll probably notice how it appears to be a squashed down version of the classic iPod design.

It’s small, it’s sexy, and it’s inexpensive.

The newest third generation iPod nano is hard to find fault with.
The nano comes in the same 4GB and 8GB sizes as older models, however this nano is far more reminiscent of the iPod Video.

Just by looking at it you’ll probably notice how it appears to be a squashed down version of the classic iPod design.

At first you may not be completely taken by this design, but when you see it in person and feel how solid it is, you’ll probably not want to let go. The larger iPod which is now called the classic has the same 320-by-240-pixel resolution and because this nano screen is slightly smaller you will actually notice a clearer picture.

The iPod nano also features Cover Flow which is a new iTunes feature which lets you see your album artwork as if it were a deck of cards flicking through space. This means that everyone on the bus can peak at all those embarrassing songs you probably wouldn’t own up to listening to. For example Tina Tuner’s “The Best” which was included on our review unit, thanks Apple!

If you’re wondering how the Cover Flow works without the whole iPod Touch functionality then you’d be pleased to hear that we think it works really well with the scroll wheel. There’s been some criticism that without touching it looses appeal. On the other hand we’d go so far as to say that the scroll wheel can be actually be more accurate for things like volume changes which require the most subtle changes.

The included ear buds are also fairly impressive and by walking through corded plastic whiteness of Sydney’s CBD, it seems that the rest of the human race tend to agree. Sure you can step it up with some after market earphones, but definitely test the larger style headphones as the nano appears to be primarily designed for in ear buds and may not power those larger cans.

As most of you probably already know, iTunes does have some limits in terms of file transferring, meaning you can’t simply look at your iPod as a portable memory device. And this may be the only true downfall as you are bound to a particular piece of software.

Finally, the price point for the nano is very appealing. The 4GB model is $199 and the 8GB is $279 so it’s really up to the consumer to decide whether or not they want to double their nano’s storage capacity or save on some cash. The nano is available now in a variety of metallic colours.

Product: iPod nano

Vendor: Apple

RRP: $199 (4gb), $279 (8gb)

Website: iPod nano

Reviewed by Michael Stark

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