Aussie Gets First R18+ Video Game

  • Legislation came into effect on January 1
  • First game to get classification
  • To be released later in this year

The first R18+ classified video game is set to hit local shores after Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor’s Edgewas given an adult rating by the Classification Board. The announcement is welcomed by

  • Legislation came into effect on January 1
  • First game to get classification
  • To be released later in this year

The first R18+ classified video game is set to hit local shores after Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor’s Edgewas given an adult rating by the Classification Board. The announcement is welcomed by the Interactive Games & Entertainment Association after more than ten years lobbying for the introduction of an R18+ classification for computer and video games.

January 1, 2013 marked the introduction of a new legislation to include an R18+ category for computer and video games. Prior to this, Australia was the only developed nation without an R18+ rating for video games despite the fact that the average Australian gamer is now 32 years old.

According to Ron Curry, CEO of Interactive Games & Entertainment Association, introducing an R18+ category for computer and video games is a key step in harmonising Australia’s overall classification scheme, and giving consumers better tools to manage and understand content in a rapidly changing environment.

“The classification guidelines for video games are now more closely aligned with the guidelines for film and TV which makes it easier for parents to make informed decisions about the interactive content they choose to buy and play,” said Curry.

Under the new legislation, computer and video games can now be classified as either G, PG, M, MA15+ or R18+.

“It’s important for people to keep close attention to these ratings before buying a game, but we also encourage parents to do their own research and read reviews about the game before they make a purchase.  This also serves as a timely reminder for parents to update control settings on game consoles to ensure children are only accessing age-appropriate content,” said Curry.

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