Vine Goes Into Porn

  • Home-made pornos
  • Videos of professional films
  • Apple takes it out of Editor's Choice

Vine videos quickly took a turn as it was widely reported that pornographic snippets were making it onto the recently released iOS app.

  • Home-made pornos
  • Videos of professional films
  • Apple takes it out of Editor's Choice

Vine videos quickly took a turn as it was widely reported that pornographic snippets were making it onto the recently released iOS app.

Having launched four days ago there are already hundreds of six-second snippets hashtagged #porn on Twitter's video-sharing app. The videos range from home-made pornos to videos of professional films.

While users have the option to report videos as offensive, Vine isn't actively moderating every upload to ensure they abide by its rules. As it outlines in its terms of service, "All Content, whether publicly posted or privately transmitted, is the sole responsibility of the person who originated such Content.”

"We may, but are not required to monitor or control the Content posted via the Services and we cannot take responsibility for such Content." When you sign up to Vine you accept that "you may be exposed to content that might be offensive, harmful, inaccurate or otherwise inappropriate" – although there's no explicit age rating or parental control option.

Well, it looks like the Twitter-owned app has now been prompted to take action as it is now blocking "many searches for pornographic terms." Searching for #porn, #sex and hashtag-prefixed parts of the human anatomy results in no results, at least at the moment.

However, it seems that Vine's pruning attempts aren't entirely successful: #pornvine and #nsfw (NSFW/not safe for work) searches are still allowed as is users' ability to tag Vines with pornographic hashtags. Others can still click on those hashtags and a feed of videos will appear just like before.

As a result of all these frenzy, it appears Apple removed Vine from its "Editor's Choice" list in the App Store on iPhone following the incident. As noted by the publication, Apple's developer guidelines state that apps "that contain user generated content that is frequently pornographic" aren't App Store material. Vine was still available for download at the time of publication.

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