Weekly App Round Up 6/08/14

Welcome to this week's Weekly App Roundup! Each week we'll be shining a light on the latest and greatest apps available for your phones and tablets. This week we're taking a look at an Australian iPhone game that seems to be the next big thing, the next big app to come to Windows Phone, and an app that will help you learn guitar!

By Alex Choros

Welcome to this week's Weekly App Roundup! Each week we'll be shining a light on the latest and greatest apps available for your phones and tablets. This week we're taking a look at an Australian iPhone game that seems to be the next big thing, the next big app to come to Windows Phone, and an app that will help you learn guitar!

Hexiled
Free
iOS

Hexiled is a word game built by two South Australian web designers, and has taken the world by storm – it has had over two million plays in the first 10 days of its availability. The game tasks players with making words out of a hexagon grid by drawing lines through them. The rules are pretty simple, words must touch an empty tile, and some are required to be a minimum length. Hexiled has three game modes, two where you play against the clock, and a third where you're able to play untimed. I can completely understand why the game's done so well so quickly, it's pretty dam addictive!

 

Beat the Q
Free
iOS, Android, Windows Phone

Beat the Q is the latest big app to make its way to Windows Phone. Windows Phone users can now join their Android and iOS brethren in pre-purchasing coffee and food from cafes and restaurants. Beat the Q makes use of phones' GPS capabilities, making it easy to find cafes that support the app. While plenty of coffee shops in Sydney's CBD allow customers to pre-purchase a coffee through the app, unfortunately there aren't any that support it near CyberShack HQ.
Beat the Q

Capo Touch
$6.99
iOS

I've actually been meaning to talk about this app for a couple of weeks now, because Capo Touch is seriously cool. Capo can take any song you have on your iPhone or iPad and provide the guitar chords (displayed with fingering) for the entire track. It doesn't always seem 100% accurate, but it certainly provides a good starting point for learning a tune. From my experience, Capo works best with chord driven songs. The app is also able to detect a song's tempo, and users are able to slow down the music, and select sections to repeat.
Capo Touch

Want more? Check out last week's apps here!

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