BMW And Their Self-Driving And Self-Parking Cars

Last year we featured the attention-powered car that uses sensors to track the driver’s awareness in order to reduce the risk of accidents. And as it turns out, in-car tech is actually getting places in some parts of the world. BMW for instance has showcased at CES three cars equipped with sensing technology that can potentially blow your mind away…


 

Last year we featured the attention-powered car that uses sensors to track the driver’s awareness in order to reduce the risk of accidents. And as it turns out, in-car tech is actually getting places in some parts of the world. BMW for instance has showcased at CES three cars equipped with sensing technology that can potentially blow your mind away.

First one up is the company’s ActiveAssist technology that was installed on a BMW M325i and a 6-series Grand coupe. Basically the ActiveAssist system allows a computer to partially or completely control a vehicle (as in self-driving cars kind of thing).

BMW showcased this technology outside of the walls of CES at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway where journalist were given a chance to try out this self-driving technology on a pre-defined course at speeds up to 80mph.

With the system on, the car is completely autonomous and can use the sensors to adjust its driving based on the current road conditions. However, BMW says that we won’t be seeing this kind of technology any time soon and adds that the system was only shown as an example or what the future of self-driving cars and in-car safety technology would be.

Aside from self-driving cars, the German carmaker also showed its electric car – the i3 and its i Remote app that works on the Samsung Galaxy Gear smartwatch. With the app, the watch can provide certain information about the car such as its remaining range, battery charge, and whether the cars doors or windows are locked.

Moreover, the app can also be used to relay instructions to the car. For example, a user can remotely open and close the car’s doors and windows; or ask the car to blow its horn (which is especially useful if you’re looking for your car in a crowded parking lot).

Lastly, the i3 features a Parking Package (worth an extra US$1000) that similar to ActiveAssist uses sensors to find and then park itself in a spot with as little as 22 inches of space with simply the driver pressing and holding a button on the car’s center console.

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