Australian Review: Jabra Sport Pulse Wireless – We like to move it

Performance
Given the name, it's not surprising that heart-rate is the main measurement Pulse bases its fitness tracking on. This is used in conjunction with inbuilt GPS in either an iPhone or Android handset. Unlike other fitness trackers, Pulse requires a constant Bluetooth connection to a phone, meaning it can't be used as a standalone device. This can be a bit problematic depending on how you like to work out. Pulse supports cycling, but I personally wouldn't want to put my iPhone 6 Plus into a pair of bike shorts.

Pulse is almost entirely used with the Jabra Sport app. The app is intuitive and easy to use; it's just a matter of choosing your type of workout (walking, cycling, running, etc) and pressing start. After you've finished, the app provides you with a fairly comprehensive overview of how you went. If you went running, it maps out your path and colour codes it based on your intensity of your exercise. Other information such as average heart rate, distance, average pace, and calories burnt is also provided. 

My favourite thing about the Pulse is the aural notifications it gives you at regular intervals during your workout. These tell you your heart-rate, the intensity of your workout, your pace, duration and distance travelled. I found these were a great motivator to push just a little harder.

In terms of audio quality, Pulse sounds fairly good for a pair of in-ear buds. It's not stellar, but the mid- and high-end both come through as crisp and clear. Unfortunately, the headphone's bass is a bit underwhelming, and almost non-existent at lower volume levels.

The biggest downside to Pulse is that it only has four and a half hours of battery life. Since its completely wireless, Pulse isn't the kind of headphone you can use all day. There's definitely enough battery to use Pulse as a headphone during your daily commute and then a workout after, but it's not a product you can use at your desk all day.

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